The Re-Construction of Black America

As I sat and tried to think of ways to better black America, some intricate plan that would resolve all the woes the plagues us I couldn’t do it. Sometimes the best solutions are the simplest.

1. Don’t have children young and out of wedlock. Young is a relative term. I would say that as a rule of thumb people should try their hardest not to have children while still a child themselves. I don’t have to look up stats to try to convince you that the younger you have children the more likely you are to land in poverty. There is no reason to rush to have children (despite what that delusional chick said on twitter today). You have your whole life to have children. They take a lot of responsibility and they take a lot of money.

2. Pick better baby fathers. I could say that more black men need to step up and handle their responsibilities (and they do) but I also think that women should share in some of this responsibility.  Men who bail on their children do themselves and their communities a disservice. My thing is I doubt that when a man leaves a woman to carry that responsibility on her own it was the first that man showed some type of sketchy or questionable behavior.

3. If you do have children play an active role in their lives and education. Help them with their homework, talk to their teachers and hold them accountable, give them structure, teach them responsibility. Don’t try to be their friend, be their parent. This goes a long way in how children view adults and authority.

4. Learning how to save money. Black people spend a considerable amount of their disposable income on depreciable products. I’m not saying that poor or less advantaged people can’t have nicer things in life but poor people have to be more cautious about how they spend money if they want to survive. If the poor want to get out of poverty they might have to save money that the middle-class might use to buy brand-name products, or go to a movie or out to dinner.

Those are my solutions. I had some more controversial ideas but I don’t think I’m ready to divulge those solutions in a public setting just yet. What do you think of these solutions? Have any of your own?

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8 thoughts on “The Re-Construction of Black America

  1. Lioness Rising

    Great Post!
    To Add: Why can’t people watch the news? Young children know all the cartoons on CN but can they spot out Brian Williams? Catie Kouric? I grew up with the TV on the news as I got ready for school in the morning. nighttime was 20/20 and Dateline. I know this contributed to my education/development. You are perceived as more intelligent when you can contribute to conversation of current events, politics etc.
    I’ve seen many reports about the difference in vocabulary between races. Children need to be exposed to high levels of vocabulary on a daily basis. And children should not be told just to sit and be quiet at the dinner table etc. A child should be encouraged to learn to hold intelligent conversations at the dinner table with adults. This was my experience and I know it wasn’t for many of my black peers. I think many times blacks like children who are “seen and not heard” but meanwhile on the other side of town white children are encouraged to question their surroundings, explore, etc which gives them tools that they carry into the classroom.

    Reply
    1. madscientist7 Post author

      the only thing i don’t like about the news (especially locally) is the amount of negative news that’s portrayed. you’d think absolutely nothing good goes on in the world if you strictly paid attention to the news.

      Reply
  2. Wu Young, AoM

    I agree with Lioness about watching the news. My siblings and I weren’t forced to watch but the local and world news was on so we watched and learned.

    For your second point I think young men should feel the same way about the young ladies they sleep with. Every girl you have sex with will not make for a good mother.

    My solutions:
    1. Read- I don’t care if it’s Amazing Spider-Man or the Fire Next Time kids have to read and read well. Parents have to encourage this.

    2. Acquire a skill. I don’t care if it’s a J.D or a welding certification. Learn how to do something legal to feed yourself.

    3. Listen- Older folks aren’t always right but they’ve been through it. Listen to the knowledge they drop and put it to good use.

    4. Eat well. – By well I mean healthy. I’m a southerner and I shocked at the shape of the circumference of our waists. I hear the horror stories that my home boy who is a RN in a cardiac ward tell and worry. Black America has to pick the right food to fuel our bodies for success.

    Reply
    1. madscientist7 Post author

      i read so much as a child. in the summers my parents would take me to the library and i would check out 15 books at a time easy and have them read in a week. read the whole goosebumps and fear street series. that is no small task either. #TeamRLStine

      Reply
    2. madscientist7 Post author

      oh and you’re absolutely correct. i was taught to be prepared to make the woman you lay down with the mother of your children. i haven’t always followed that advice but i try my best.

      Reply
  3. Divine Pearlz

    I agree 100%. With regards to picking baby fathers, I can not stress this enough. I love my mother dearly but I always throw shots at how she have chosen my father better. Her being a woman enough agrees 100%. While there is nothing that she can do now, she has made it her mission to preach to my brothers the steps needed to be a good man which in turn can lead to a great father.

    When it comes to television, growing up I didn’t have cable (I was 13 when we finally got cable) and my mother for the most part kept our TV on channels 13 and 21. She limited what we could watch. She encouraged reading and as a matter of fact b/c I would read anything she had to monitor what I was reading to ensure that it was age appropriate. I loved going to my grand mother’s house and picking through all of the books that she had. By the time I was 10, I had read Roots and Malcolm X.

    We need to be better examples for the youth and stop living by the mindset of don’t do what I do rather do what I say. Children for the most part of visual learners.Less than stellar examples of how one should behave is why I am so into mentoring. I do it with my Sorority’s youth group, my friend’s children, my younger siblings, and any other young person that I may come into contact with. If we all take that attitude even the children who stem from rotten apples can become able bodied individuals who contribute positive things to our community.

    Reply
  4. Mika. (@MikasThoughts)

    Excellent examples.

    But first it must start with knowing that as a race we are so much better than our current condition. We need to know about about our ancestors; we come from beautiful cloth. We come from royalty — King and Queens, we come from a continent of countries with natural resources and beautiful people! Africa, that is. We need to believe this and then teach the children about our history and instill in them values and character that consist of love and self-worth.

    Reply
  5. A Woman's Eyes

    To take this even deeper, I would say:

    A. The development of emotional maturity is valuable to being able to feel connected within our relationships with those we love…there are so many people who find that they or the person they sleep with are great lovers but terrible at conflict resolution, coming up with a plan together, being responsible in spite of differences with the people they chose to have sex with. This leads to bigger conflict and more conflict if they should ever become parents unintentionally. The lack of emotional maturity fuels adults thinking of their own needs/wants/desires above the need of a child or children to have both parents in his/her life, even if the parents are no longer together. If we have grown up with one or both parents missing from our life, the health of our future relationships benefit from examining how we learned how to resolve conflicts and have a meaningful relationship with people who are not blood, yet hold a deep role in our life as lovers, partners, girlfriend/boyfriend, spouse.

    B. For those of us who did all the right things and are contemplating marriage, get a fertility work up. The older a woman is when she decides to become a mother, the lower her fertility rate does. There are upwardly mobile well educated married Black couples who are keeping the secret that they have had to spend years at the fertility doctors in order to try to conceive when they’ve checked all their Is and dotted all their Ts before they chose to have children.

    C. Use condoms each and every time. This goes back to taking full responsibility for the health of our bodies. We are the small percentage of the American population, yet the highest percentage within total HIV and AIDS cases. Many of us do not know our HIV status. The longer a HIV positive person goes without being tested and thus finding out their status, the longer this person goes without the problem health interventions and thus the higher risk of death from complications from HIV or AIDS.

    D. Health is our true wealth. The cost of being ill due to poor diet, not enough or no exercise is actually financially, emotionally, socially, psychologically higher than the cost of acquiring fruits, vegetables and exercise. Even with health insurance, the total amount of co-pays for multiple trips to the doctor due to diabetes, hypertension, PTSD, stress in the years it affects our life is very high.

    E. Be our children’s advocate 24/7. Not just when they are home from school. We cannot take for granted that schools are supposed to educate our children. We must know our children’s teacher’s names, and be familiar with what they are learning and how they are doing in school academically, socially and psychologically. If teachers are responding to our children as if they are a problem, and that teaching them is a burden, our children lose their desire to succeed and learn in school if we are not the ones actively involved with what is going on with them at school. Our children are suspended for less infractions than their White peers and diagnosed with ADHD at higher rates than their White peers. Without being involved in knowing their school business, we won’t know when they have begun to struggle with ADHD or worse of all, if we are not informed on the proper way to diagnoses ADHD, our children are likely to be over-medicated or given powerful psychotropic drugs that they do not need due to an incorrect diagnosis of ADHD and live with side effects of those medications.

    Reply

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